“The Colored Patriots of the American Revolution”

Documents

ca. 1855

Boston

From the Wendell Phillips papers, 1555-1882, (bulk) 1833-1881

Houghton Library, Harvard University

Original Record

{"autoplay":"true","autoplay_speed":3000,"speed":300,"arrows":"true","dots":"true"}

When William C. Nell published The Colored Patriots of the American Revolution, he became the first published Black historian. Through writing this book and sharing the stories and accomplishments of African Americans, Nell hoped to “encourage black pride and continued accomplishments.”

Full text of book can be found in the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill’s Documenting the American South project.

 

Questions to Consider

  1. What does the pamphlet mean when it states the book was “compiled as a means of enlightening public sentiment on an interesting, but much neglected department of American History?”
  2. Why do you think it’s important to learn about the stories of people from diverse backgrounds?

 

Transcription

A BOOK FOR THE TIMES

COLORED PATRIOTS
OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

With Sketches of Several Distinguished Colored Persons: to which is added a Brief Survey of the Condition and Prospects of Colored Americans.

BY WILLIAM C. NELL.

395 Pages. Price $1,25.
This sum pre-paid will ensure a Copy by Mail.

No. 21 CORNHILL, BOSTON.

This Work has been compiled as a means of enlightening public sentiment on an interesting, but much neglected department of American History, and is graced with an introduction by Mrs. HARRIET BEECHER STOWE, and illustrated by engravings of CRISPUS ATTUCKS, the First Martyr in the Boston Massacre of March 5th, 1770; PETER SALEM, on Bunker Hill; and a fan simile Autographic Certificate of General WASHINGTON, tendered to a Colored Soldier. The increasing interest on the general subject of Slavery, invests this book with a rare attraction at the present time; for throughout its pages are exhibited various phases of the “peculiar institution,” interwoven with incidents of patriotism and bravery of Colored Americans in “the days that tried men’s souls!” From several commendatory notices of the Press, the following are selected

 

Related Articles

Smith Court Stories

Smith Court Stories is a collaborative project of the Museum of African American History and Boston African American National Historic Site – a unit of the National Parks of Boston.

The creators of Smith Court Stories acknowledge that Smith Court in Beacon Hill sits on the unceded territory of the Massachusett Peoples, and their neighbors the Wampanoag and Nipmuc Peoples. We recognize these communities have stewarded this land for hundreds of generations.