Archaeological Objects

Early 1800s

“Investigating the Heart of a Community: Archaeological Excavations at the African Meeting House, Boston, Massachusetts.”

Cultural Resource Management Study No. 22

Figure 5.6

Andrew Fiske Memorial Center for Archaeological Research.

University of Massachusetts Boston, page 82.

Original Record

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Pearlware, like this cup, accounted for about half of the ceramics found in the 2005 archaeological excavation at the African Meeting House. Many of the pearlware were hand painted and date back to before the 1840s. This cup is hand painted with a polychrome floral design. The total amount of ceramics found at the excavation could be a result of the public dinners at the African Meeting House or the tenancy of Domingo Williams.*

 

Questions to Consider:

  1. What do the cups and other pearlware found in the excavation tell you about community activities at the African Meeting House?
  2. Are there any places in your life where you gather with friends, family, and your community? If there was an archaeological excavation there 100 years from now, what would archaeologists find?

 

“Investigating the Heart of a Community: Archaeological Excavations at the African Meeting House, Boston, Massachusetts.” Cultural Resource Management Study No. 22 by the Andrew Fiske Memorial Center for Archaeological Research. University of Massachusetts Boston, pages 79-86.

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Smith Court Stories

Smith Court Stories is a collaborative project of the Museum of African American History and Boston African American National Historic Site – a unit of the National Parks of Boston.

The creators of Smith Court Stories acknowledge that Smith Court in Beacon Hill sits on the unceded territory of the Massachusett Peoples, and their neighbors the Wampanoag and Nipmuc Peoples. We recognize these communities have stewarded this land for hundreds of generations.